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The National Digital Program of the Government of Israel

Appendix A – Writing the National Digital Program

The National Digital Program of the government of Israel was formulated by the Bureau based on the primary goals and the strategic objectives of the National Initiative, as defined in government resolution no.1046[86].

Furthermore, the National Program also addresses the work of the Government ICT Authority, and therefore includes relevant activities relating to the Authority’s strategic plan. The formulation process also included consultation with government offices and all relevant partners to the Initiative from the private and third sectors, with the involvement of the public on material issues.

The Plan’s conceptual framework and its structure were based on a comprehensive international comparison of national digitization programs in a variety of countries, alongside a review of specific programs on digital issues (for example, digital literacy). The aim of the international review was to identify successful and relevant case studies (best practices), among them the national programs of Britain, Estonia, Sweden, Denmark, Germany, USA, the Philippines and Australia. As noted, main emphases were derived from the review that are particularly relevant to Israel’s National Initiative, among them emphases addressing the strategic objectives themselves (for example, the means for developing the employment market in the digital age, or improving digital literacy among disenfranchised populations) and mapping key international indexes. Special attention was given to Britain’s Digital by Default program from which main principles were taken, as well as initiatives such as the digital leaders program and the open code of the consolidated Gov.uk website. This learning and cooperation assisted in designing the National Initiative policy and its activities, and are beneficial in implementing lessons and insights from parallel activities abroad. The Bureau was also assisted by information about digital policy from the D5 forum of the five leading digital governments (Britain, South Korea, New Zealand, Estonia and Israel), which Israel joined in 2014.

The Plan was formulated and written with the assistance of the strategic consulting company TASC Consulting & Capital. TASC helped in conducting a comprehensive international comparative study, conducting interviews and discussions with relevant entities, analyzing OECD indices and studies on the topic, formulating the strategic objectives and writing the Program.

Due to the dynamic nature of the digital field and the rapid and frequent development of technologies and new trends, the National Digital Program will be updated continuously and adapted to the renewed reality. Furthermore, the Plan will develop as the National Initiative progresses, in light of the activity areas that will be added in the future, and following formulation of the ministerial digital programs.

Endnotes

1. World Bank Group, ICT for Greater Development Impact, June 15, 2012.

2. ITU, ICT Facts and Figures – The World in 2015;it should be noted that the percentage of mobile phone users is most likely smaller as many mobile users have more than one mobile number.

3. IBM, Bringing Big Data to the Enterprise, 2012.

4. Accenture, Digital Disruption: The Growth Multiplier, 2016

5. For more information about the contribution of ICT technologies to the economy, see Part B, Chapter 2: Primary Goal – Accelerated Economic Growth.

6. Gross Domestic Expenditure on R&D: As a Percentage of GDP, OECD 2015.

7. Economist, Venture-Capital Investment per Person, 2010

.8 Akamai’s State of the Internet Report, 2015 ;OECD, Digital Economy Outlook, 2015. The average data transmission rate in Israel is 11.2 megabytes per second.

9. Digital literacy represents a set of skills required for using computers, technologies and applications in the digital age.

10. OECD, Skills Matter, Further results from the survey of adult skills – Competence and problem solving in technology-rich environments – Israel, 2016.

11. United Nations e-government survey 2014

12. OECD, Government at a Glance, 2015.

13. Government Resolution No. 2097 of October 10, 2014, Expand the Government’s ICT activity areas, foster innovation in the public sector and advance the Digital Israel Initiative.

14. For example, the National Insurance Institute (NIS) developed 14 online forms through which services most used are fully digital, among them receiving maternity allowance and reserve duty allowance. Despite this progress, more than 200 forms on the Institute’s website can still not be submitted online, only by fax or hardcopy.

15. OECD, Government at a Glance, 2015.

16. OECD, Digital Economy Outlook, 2015.

17. Government Resolution No. 1046 of December 15, 2013, The Digital Israel National Initiative.

18. Government Resolution No. 2097 of October 10, 2014, Expand the Government’s ICT activity areas, foster innovation in the public sector and advance the Digital Israel Initiative.

19. Government Resolution No. 151 of June 25, 2015, Advance the strategic issue of Digital Israel as derived from the Strategic Socioeconomic Assessment Report for the government.

20. Government Resolution No. 151 of June 25, 2015, Advance the strategic issue of Digital Israel derived from the Strategic Socioeconomic Assessment Report for the government.

21.OECD, Inequality and Growth, 2014. Today, the richest 10% of the population in the OECD area earn 9.5 times more than the poorest 10%. By contrast, in the 1980s the ratio stood at 7:1.

22. OECD, Income Distribution Database (IDD): Gini, Poverty, Income, Methods and Concepts.

23. Israel Central Bureau of Statistics, Peripheral Index of Local Authorities 2004. As defined in the CBS Peripheral Index.

24. Israel National ICT Index,2014 .

25. Central Bureau of Statistics Social Survey, 2014

26. From the Central Bureau of Statistics Social Survey, 2015

27. OECD, Skills matter, Further results from the survey of adult skills, Competence and problem solving in technology-rich environments – Israel, 2016.

28. Bank of Israel Annual Report, 2015, Chapter H, Welfare Issues.

29. The Knesset Research and Information Center – Department of Budgetary Control, data about the cost of living in Israel compared to the developed countries, update, 2014.

30. OECD, Economic Surveys, Israel January 2016.

31. State Comptroller Report, Housing Crisis, 2015.

32. Technology changes Banking, Dr. Hedva Ber, Supervisor of Banks, Globes Conference, December 6, 2015.

33. This alongside the contribution to the quality of education, by combining advanced and up-to-date multimedia contents in the digital platform.

34. State Comptroller Report, Non-Realization of Social Rights, 2015.

35. Report of the Alaluf Committee to Fight Poverty, 2014.

36. State Comptroller Report, Non-Realization of Social Rights, 2015.

37. State Comptroller Report, Non-Realization of Social Rights, 2015.

38. Report of the Alaluf Committee to Fight Poverty, 2014.

39. The World Bank, GDP Growth (annual %).

40. World Bank Group, Global Economic Prospects, 01/2016

41. Israel Central Bureau of Statistics, Average wages per employee Job, by industry, in current prices (2015 data).

42. International Telecommunication Union, Impact of Broadband on the Economy, 04/2012

43. See Part A Chapter 2 – State of digitization in Israel.

44. OECD, Digital Economy Outlook, 2015.

45. Israel Central Bureau of Statistics, Unfilled positions classified by occupation and economic sector, update to April 14, 2016.

46. Israel Central Bureau of Statistics, Total output, gross value added and export in ICT sector, 2015.

47. Israel Central Bureau of Statistics, Average wages per employee job, by industry, in current prices (2015 data); OECD, Digital Economy Outlook, 2015.

48. The Economic Value of Data Driven Innovation, Deloitte Israel, 2016.

49. World Economic Forum, The Future of FinTech, 10/2015

50. Ministry of Economy and Industry – The Small and Medium Business Agency, Periodic Report – State of Small and Medium Businesses in Israel 2013-2014, September 2014.

51. An example of population groups that can benefit from telework models are working mothers, residents of the geographic periphery and persons with movement disabilities.

52. Prominent examples of digital programs that include the objective of expanding the number of workers in the ICT fields: Estonia, Sweden and the Philippines.

53. According to the OECD definition for ICT specialists – workers who have the ability to develop, operate and maintain ICT systems, and for whom ICT tools constitute the main part of their job. OECD, Information Technology Outlook, 2004.

54. Akamai’s State of the Internet Report, 2015; OECD, Digital Economy Outlook, 2015. The average data transmission rate in Israel is 11.2 megabytes per second.

55. OECD, Digital Economy Outlook, 2015.

56. This refers to individuals, non-governmental organizations, universities, public and private companies, etc.

57. Government Resolution No. 1046 of December 15, 2013, The Digital Israel Initiative.

58. Among other thing, for example, meeting OECD requirements underlying economic and commercial collaborations with Europe, and prevent revoking of Israel’s adequacy status.

59. For more information on the subject of secure identification, see Chapter 3, Strategic Objective 1: Access to government and local authority.

60. According to indicators of the Ease Of Doing Business Index, World Bank.

61. Open Government Partnership.

62. The Government ICT Authority, Strategic Plan for 2015-2018.

63. Government Resolution No. 1008 of January17, 2016.

64. The Government ICT Authority, strategic plan for 2015-2018.

65. Open Government Partnership

66. World Bank Group, Open Data for Economic Growth, June 25, 2014.

67. Government Resolution No. 4515 of April 1, 2012 and Resolution No. 2097 of October 10, 2014.

68. Government Resolution No. 1933 of August 30, 2016, improving the transfer of government information and accessibility of government databases to the public.

69. World Bank Group, Doing Business, 2016.

70. Government Resolution No. 890 of December 27, 2015.

71. From methodology of the Doing Business Index, 2016.

72. Government Resolution No. 2097 of October 10, 2014.

73. ICT For Everyone – a Digital Agenda for Sweden; Digital Agenda 2020 for Estonia; Digital Welfare Denmark, etc.

74. eHealth Action Plan 2012-2020 – Innovative healthcare for the 21st century

75. OECD Health Statistics, 2015

76. OECD Economic Survey 2016

77. Government Resolution No. 1046 of December 15, 2013, The Digital Israel Initiative. For more information see Part A, Chapter 3 – The background of the Digital Israel Initiative.

78. Government Resolution No. 36 of May 26, 2015, Transfer of activity areas and authority to the Ministry of Senior Citizens and the Minister of Senior Citizens.

79. Government Resolution No. 1046 of December 15, 2013, The Digital Israel Initiative; Government Resolution No. 151 of July 28, 2015. See Part A Chapter 3 – the background of the Digital Israel Initiative.

80. Government Resolution No. 2097 of October 10, 2014. Expand the Government’s ICT activity areas, foster innovation in the public sector and advance the “Digital Israel” National Initiative.

81. Government Resolution No. 1046 of December 15, 2013, The Digital Israel National Initiative.

82. Government Resolution No. 151 of June 28, 2015.

83. Government Resolution No. 1046 of December 15, 2013. The Digital Israel National Initiative.

84. Including for example, laying optical fiber cables and advancing the unified identification area in Israel.

85. Government Resolution No. 2097 of October 10, 2014, expanding the Government’s ICT activity areas, fostering innovation in the public sector and advancing the “Digital Israel” National Initiative.

86. Government Resolution No. 1046 of December 15, 2013. The “Digital Israel” National Initiative.

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